Tag Archives: ghost films

2020 Spooky Film Recommendations — Part I

As I’ve said before, if you crave 500 jump scares per film, you will be disappointed by my recommendations. For more context on this, check out Chris Stuckmann’s YouTube video, The Problem with Horror Movies Today.

This year we begin with CLASSIC HORROR, and I arbitrarily decided this would include films from the 70s and earlier. Let me tell you, one of the fantastic things about watching films of this vintage was the total (and to me blessed) absence of computer-generated imagery. Directors and cinematographers had to be clever in suggesting a horror they did not have the means to show. All the more creepy!
(All synopses from imdb.com)

Enthusiastically Recommended!


The Wicker Man (1973) — Rated R
A puritan Police Sergeant arrives in a Scottish island village in search of a missing girl who the locals claim never existed.
I’ve had a crush on the late, great Edward Woodward ever since the TV series The Equalizer, but I’d never seen this movie until a month ago. The story starts as a rather ordinary noir-ish police procedural, turns trippy, and then really gets down to the business of horror, all in a very “early 70s” manner that I found rather charming.
Watch the Trailer / Options for Viewing / Metascore: 87


The Omen (1976) — Rated R
Mysterious deaths surround an American ambassador. Could the child that he is raising actually be the Antichrist? The Devil’s own son?
I have a vague memory of catching a bit of this as a child when my parents were watching. Back then I probably lasted about two minutes before I ran screaming. It’s a much better story and film than I expected. The female characters are either evil or useless, but aside from that it’s a darn good watch–well-paced with some very shocking scenes.
Watch the Trailer / Options for Viewing / Metascore: 62


Carrie (1976) — Rated R
Carrie White, a shy, friendless teenage girl who is sheltered by her domineering, religious mother, unleashes her telekinetic powers after being humiliated by her classmates at her senior prom.
Despite the strong dose of male gaze in the opening sequence (a shower scene, which arguably is an integral part of the plot), I found this a compelling film. The strong performances from Betty Buckley, Sissy Spacek, and others (you’ll find many familiar faces) give this twisted tale a heartbreaking authenticity. It also features the WEIRDEST “cute boy” hairdo I’ve ever seen.
Watch the Trailer / Options for Viewing / Metascore: 85


Rosemary’s Baby (1968) — Rated R
A young couple trying for a baby move into a fancy apartment surrounded by peculiar neighbors.
This film starts quietly and meanders toward a horrific finale, requiring a certain investment of time and patience. I thought I knew what was going on, then I questioned everything, and then the finale pretty much blew my mind. There’s a great 2018 Vanity Fair essay by Laura Jacobs that fans of the film should read: The Devil Inside: Watching Rosemary’s Baby in the Age of #MeToo.
Watch the excellent fan-made Trailer / Options for Viewing / Metascore: 96


The Exorcist (1973) — Rated R
When a 12-year-old girl is possessed by a mysterious entity, her mother seeks the help of two priests to save her.
I have avoided this movie all my life…until this past Sunday. 45 minutes into it, I told my husband I had to walk away. I COULD NOT WATCH IT AT NIGHT. Reader, we DID return to it the next afternoon. We finished the movie, and it was brilliantly harrowing. For me, the most disturbing parts weren’t necessarily the paranormal bits. I mean, the hospital scenes! Poor Father Karras, carrying the burden of his guilt and grief, hit me the hardest. I really loved this film, but it’s no picnic.
Watch the Trailer / Options for Viewing / Metascore: 81

Finished, not sure I recommend
The Haunting of Julia (1977)
After her daughter’s death, wealthy American homemaker Julia Lofting moves to London to restart her life. All seems well until she is haunted by the ghosts of other children while mourning for her own.
This premise appealed to me, and I do think waifish, vulnerable Mia Farrow is quite good in the role. The film meanders quite a bit, however, and I’m not sure the conclusion is earned. (Or maybe I was just being a lazy viewer?) You can watch on Prime or Youtube.

Watched at least 20 minutes and lost interest
Amityville Horror (1979) — obviously this is a horror classic, but I just didn’t care about the characters. James Brolin, in particular, seemed to be sleepwalking through his performance.
Halloween (1978) — I love Jamie Lee Curtis and Donald Pleasance, but this did not grab me. (Feel free to convince me to try again!)

Stay tuned for more spooky film recommendations. I’d love to know your thoughts about these films, and feel free to share your favorite horror movies from the 60s and 70s in the comments!

Part II: Ghostly and Gothic SPOOKY films

Oh, how I love a good GHOST film! Ghosts and/or related paranormal entities feature in each of the following recommendations.

All film synopses are from imdb.com.


The Wind (2018) — Rated R
A plains-woman faces the harshness and isolation of the untamed land in the Western frontier of the late 1800s. This film, written and directed by women, is visually arresting and emotionally harrowing. It’s also non-linear and requires active viewing. I’ve long been captivated by pioneer narratives and the “romance” of homesteading, but this film really brought home how difficult such a life could be. It also added a lovely Gothic twist to the mix. I will watch this one again.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 66


Don’t Leave Home (2018) — Not Rated
An American artist’s obsession with a disturbing urban legend leads her to an investigation of the story’s origins at the crumbling estate of a reclusive painter in Ireland. This one had me at “crumbling estate”! I’ve never encountered a story quite like this, and I can’t tell you too much about it without spoiling. It’d be better if you just watched so we can talk about it later. This is another one I plan to see again.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 65


Astral (2018) — Rated TV-MA
A detached university student faces the consequences of astral projection when he uses it to reconnect with his dead mother. This is not your glossy, high-budget sort of horror film, and all the user reviews on IMDB indicate that no one liked it. But I had to watch because I’m rather obsessed with the narrative potential of astral projection. Also, the lead actor played Tom Riddle and is the RADA-trained son of Stephen Dillane (Stannis Baratheon in Game of Thrones, and much more). Viewing this required patience, but the story eventually builds into something rather dramatic. I thought it was worth watching and I enjoyed the fact that most of the action takes place at Royal Holloway. (Do I need to watch Fear the Walking Dead now?)
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / No Metascore


Haunted (Hjemsøkt) (2017) — Not Rated
After her father’s death Catherine travels back to her old family estate in winter time Norway. When locals start telling stories of disappearances and possible murders, she is forced to confront her family’s mysterious past. There’s nothing particular ground-breaking about this ghost story–it doesn’t have any special bells or whistles–but I loved it all the same. The Norwegian setting is gorgeous. (Just look at that still above.) The lead actress is a pleasure to watch. The story held my attention to the very end, and I look forward to watching it again. I have one quibble that I’m longing to discuss, so do let me know if you watch.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / No Metascore


Clara’s Ghost (2018) — Not Rated
Set over the course of a single evening in the Reynolds family home in suburban Connecticut, Clara’s Ghost tells the story of Clara Reynolds who, fed up with constant ribbing from her self-absorbed showbiz family, finds solace in and guidance from the supernatural force she believes is haunting her. I didn’t quite know what I was getting into when I started watching this. It features a hilariously dysfunctional family of actors who decide to gather in order to torment each other AND celebrate their dog’s birthday. Bad behavior ensues. This is another film written and directed by a woman, and I absolutely love the fact that it was a family project. I look forward to Bridey Elliot’s next film.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 66

BONUS! Ghostly films I enjoy watching again and again:
The Haunting (1963) — Previously discussed here.
The Changeling (1980) — Previously discussed here.
The Others (2001)
The Eclipse (2009) — Previously discussed here (scroll all the way down)
The Awakening (2011) — Previously discussed here.
The Conjuring (2013)

Part I: Family Friendly SPOOKY Films

I’m launching this year’s festivities with a few movies the whole family might enjoy. Please check the Parental Guide for each title. If you’re new to the blog and have younger children, you might check my 2016 post that includes solidly PG films, and don’t forget last year’s family viewing options. If you have tweens and teens interested in watching horror, the following options might appeal. Of course, you are the best judge of what your kids can or can’t handle in a scary film.

PLEASE NOTE: if you crave 500 jump scares per film, you may be disappointed by my recommendations. For more context on this, check out Chris Stuckmann’s youtube video, The Problem with Horror Movies Today–he makes a great point.

As usual, all film synopses are from imdb.com.


The Hole in the Ground (2019) — Rated R (not sure why?)
A young mother living in the Irish countryside with her son suspects his increasingly disturbing behavior is linked to a mysterious sinkhole in the forest, and fears he may not be her son at all. This is a bit slow to start, perhaps, but your patience will be rewarded. You’ll also be pleased to see the ubiquitous and always delightful James Cosmo. This film is both familiar and unique, and I loved the setting.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / IMDB Parental Guide /
Metascore: 63


Wait Till Helen Comes (2016) — Rated TV-14
When a reconstructed family moves to a converted church in the country, 14-year-old Molly, must save her new troubled step-sister from a dangerous relationship with the desperate ghost of a young girl. Raise your hand if you loved this book by Mary Downing Hahn! I’ve read it twice, and I thought this adaptation was pretty strong–spooky and tense without being gruesome, vulgar, or gratuitously violent. Great family fare, but not recommended for the little ones.
Watch the trailer / Options for Viewing / IMDB Parental Guide / No metascore


The Witch in the Window (2018) — Not rated
When Simon brings his twelve year-old son, Finn, to rural Vermont to help flip an old farmhouse, they encounter the malicious spirit of Lydia, a previous owner. And now with every repair they make – she’s getting stronger. This is my favorite of the family viewing options, and it’s one of my favorite spooky movies viewed this year. It’s so wonderfully character-driven and felt like I was getting a view into the world of a real family–a family I cared deeply about. Speaking of jump scares, there’s a well-earned one that made me squeak!
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / IMDB Parental Guide / No Metascore

Perhaps best for 14-up due to language & violence:


The Dark (2005) — Rated R
In mourning over the tragic drowning of their daughter Sarah, James and Adèle are visited by Ebrill, a young girl who claims she died 60 years ago – and bears a startling resemblance to Sarah. Maria Bello and Sean Bean (!) star in this dark and creepy mystery set on the Welsh coast (but shot in Ireland, of course). It’s a good-looking film with lots of cool Gothic trappings, and yet a bit darker than the options listed above. Based on the novel Sheep, by Simon Maginn.
Watch the Trailer / Options for viewing / IMDB Parental Guide / No Metascore


Summer of ’84 — Not Rated
After suspecting that their police officer neighbor is a serial killer, a group of teenage friends spend their summer spying on him and gathering evidence, but as they get closer to discovering the truth, things get dangerous. Very reminiscent of Stranger Things, this film offers mystery and thrills without the paranormal content. Fair warning: crude language and teen boy humor abound, and the finale is grim.
Watch the Trailer / Options for Viewing / IMDB Parental Guide / Metascore: 57

Stay tuned for ghostly film recommendations!

2018 Spooky Film Recs, Part IV: Family Viewing

For my final “Spooky Films” post, I’m offering some suggestions for family viewing. If you’re new to the blog and have younger children, you might check my 2016 post that includes solidly PG films. If you have tweens and teens interested in watching horror, the following PG/PG-13 options might appeal. Of course, you are the best judge of what your kids can or can’t handle in a scary film.

As usual, all film synopses are from imdb.com.


Spirited Away (2001) — Rated PG
During her family’s move to the suburbs, a sullen 10-year-old girl wanders into a world ruled by gods, witches, and spirits, and where humans are changed into beasts.
You’re all probably way ahead of me on this one. I’d heard about it for years but didn’t think it was my sort of thing. Then I watched with a friend and her kiddos. Gosh! Such a lovely, haunting, and spooky film. “No Face” (seen above in the middle) now numbers among my very favorite film characters. Those in the know — are there any other spooky anime films I should track down?
Watch the trailer / available on DVD only (from various retailers) / Metascore: 96
(the highest IMDB metascore of any film I’ve recommended!)
Goth-o-Meter: medium-ish?


Down a Dark Hall (2018) — PG-13
A troubled teen named Kit Gordy is forced to join the exclusive Blackwood Boarding School, just to find herself trapped by dark forces around its mysterious headmistress, Madame Duret.
This one had me at “all-female boarding school.” Fans of Lois Duncan should get a kick out of it — the setting is properly Gothic and the cast (featuring Uma Thurman with a believable French accent) is strong. The atmosphere oozes with old-fashioned menace, but the students bring a modern edge to the “haunted boarding school” narrative. Lots of drama and even a little romance.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 56
Goth-o-Meter: high


Our House (2018) — PG-13
A young genius accidentally invents a device that amplifies the paranormal activity within his family’s house, possibly bringing back the spirits of loved ones, and unleashing things far worse.
I like a little technology with my ghosts, especially when accidental contact occurs. The pacing in this one isn’t without its problems, but I found the family very appealing and right away I cared about their safety. You might call this a “modern domestic ghost story,” and I like that it offers mystery and chills without going too far with jump scares or violence.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 45
(the lowest metascore of all my recs, but I really did think this was worth watching!)
Goth-o-Meter: medium to high


Beautiful Creatures (2013) — PG-13
Ethan longs to escape his small Southern town. He meets a mysterious new girl, Lena. Together, they uncover dark secrets about their respective families, their history and their town.
I read this book when it first came out and quite enjoyed it, but the trailers for the film turned me off. It all just looked waaaay over-the-top. But when I was searching for films to watch this year, this one came up again and again as a strong option. After all, it does have an incredible cast–Jeremy Irons, Viola Davis, Emmy Rossum, Eileen Atkins and Emma Thompson–but it’s Alden Ehrenreich and Alice Englert who make this movie work. If you can get past Ehrenreich’s Forrest Gump-voiceover at the beginning, you’ll see what I mean. They are both sympathetic and have great chemistry together. Yes, there are outrageous moments in this film, but overall I found it intriguing and satisfying — including the (somewhat abrupt) ending.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 52
Goth-o-Meter: high


Happy Death Day (2017) — PG-13
A college student must relive the day of her murder over and over again, in a loop that will end only when she discovers her killer’s identity.
As I’ve said before, I don’t enjoy slasher films unless they are quirky and/or funny. This horror spin on Groundhog Day was exactly what I was looking for. I’ve seen it characterized as “relentlessly violent,” but I assure you that there’s not much blood/gore at all, and though the film does get the pulse racing, the tone is playful. It’s along the lines of the SCREAM movies, but with much less blood.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 57
Goth-o-Meter: low

Here’s a list of other PG-13 Horror options, though I’m kind of horrified that The Ring is included. That one really got to me–I enjoyed it, but it’s more at the “disturbing” end of the spooky continuum. There are moments in that film I wish I could unsee.

Also keep in mind that two of the films mentioned earlier in my 2018 recs are PG-13 — A Quiet Place and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. The Endless is unrated, but I think it would be appropriate for teens and mature tweens.

That’s it for 2018, folks! Happy Horror Viewing and REMEMBER, if at any point you wish to browse previous spooky film recs (going all the way back to 2012), click the tag “spooky film recs” in the list below–or in the sidebar–and scroll to your heart’s content.

2018 Spooky Film Recs Part II: Ghostly Favorites

In this post I hope to inspire you to watch some ghost films that flew under the radar during the past couple of years. I’ve come to appreciate lower-budget/independent ghostly films because there’s much less reliance on expensive special effects and, in many cases, more appreciation of characterization and tension. If you’ve already seen or plan to watch any of the options suggested here, please let me know what you think!

As always, the brief synopses are from imdb.com.


The Lodgers (2017) — Rated R
1920, rural Ireland. Anglo Irish twins Rachel and Edward share a strange existence in their crumbling family estate.
This was right up my alley in the Gothic department–haunting and atmospheric if not truly frightening. (Seriously, if you prefer a fast-paced story with lots of jump scares, don’t bother with this one.) Charlotte Vega is quite good as dominant twin Rachel, but the true star of this film is Loftus Hall, a centuries-old (and reputedly haunted-in-real-life) Irish country house. While there is a strong fantasy element to the story, the script also takes into account the social and political turmoil in early 20th century Ireland. I would watch this one again–it’s so lovely to look at!
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 52
Goth-o-Meter: very high


Marrowbone (2017) — Rated R
A young man and his three younger siblings, who have kept secret the death of their beloved mother in order to remain together, are plagued by a sinister presence in the sprawling manor in which they live.
Marrowbone offers so many of my favorite things: a gorgeous setting (supposedly the U.S. but actually filmed in Spain), a focus on characterization, moments of sweetness that balance the Gothic peril, and an ending that makes you want to go back to the beginning and watch all over again. (Random observation: this will only resonate with people of a certain age, but to me it’s almost like a horror version of Dear Lola, which was adapted to film as The Beniker Gang.) The film is not without flaws, but it’s very compelling overall and I will watch it again. Stranger Things fans will be pleased to see Charlie Heaton–and to hear his native English accent.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 63
Goth-o-Meter: high


Personal Shopper (2016) — Rated R
A personal shopper in Paris refuses to leave the city until she makes contact with her twin brother who previously died there. Her life becomes more complicated when a mysterious person contacts her via text message.
If you’re looking for a very unique sort of ghost story/mystery, this might fit the bill. It does require patience and an open mind, but the film really is rather fabulous. I re-watched several scenes afterwards and couldn’t stop thinking about it for days–I hadn’t expected to find Kristen Stewart so compelling. (Reviews are all over the place with this one–so it was reassuring that my favorite YouTube film reviewer, Chris Stuckmann, liked it as much as I did).
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 77
Goth-o-Meter: medium (there are Gothic moments in this film, but overall I consider it to be more in the realm of Noir.)


The Keeping Hours (2017) — Rated PG-13
10 years after the death of their son, a divorced couple is suddenly reunited by supernatural events that offer them a chance at forgiveness.
This film must have gone straight to Netflix–it has no reviews from mainstream critics–so I went in with low expectations. You guys! It really got to me. First of all, fans of Lee Pace should watch–he is lovely and will break your heart in the best way. (He’s a native Oklahoman, y’all!) This film derives its eeriness more from grief and longing than jump scares. There are deliciously spooky bits, but nothing to give you nightmares. If you’re anything like me, you’ll cry and find it all very cathartic.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / No IMDB metascore — check Rotten Tomatoes
Goth-o-Meter: medium to high

***You might also consider:

Ghost Stories (2017) — Not Rated
Skeptical professor Phillip Goodman embarks on a trip to the terrifying after finding a file with details of three unexplained cases of apparitions. (Adapted from a play and featuring Martin Freeman in one of the vignettes.)
The three cases are interesting and spooky, but the frame narrative did not work for me.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 68
Goth-o-Meter: medium to high?

A Ghost Story (2017) — rated R
In this singular exploration of legacy, love, loss, and the enormity of existence, a recently deceased, white-sheeted ghost returns to his suburban home to try to reconnect with his bereft wife.
Not a “thrill-a-minute” sort of ghost movie. It is fascinating and quite moving, but perhaps a smidge pretentious? Your mileage may vary. (There is a cool tribute to Poltergeist at the mid-point. In fact, I was fascinated by this slideshow overview of the writer/director’s influences.)
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 84
Goth-o-Meter: medium

Check back on Wednesday when I’ll be recommending “under the radar” ghost-free horror films. AND REMEMBER, if at any point you wish to browse previous spooky film recs (going all the way back to 2012), click the tag “spooky film recs” in the list below–or in the sidebar–and scroll to your heart’s content.