Tag Archives: cozy mysteries

Cozy distractions in the time of Corona

Even if you’re healthy and safe at home, you may be losing your mind right about now. I’ve put together a list of things (in no particular order) that might brighten your mood during this surreal quarantine from the rest of humanity.

— First of all, complete your 2020 Census! It may not be a cheerful activity, but it doesn’t take long and you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment when done.

— Please visit Sampy and friends in Finland. Seriously, CLICK THAT LINK! You can’t help but cheer up when you see Sampy, Hiskias, and Elmeri cavorting in the snow. They are magical creatures and they always fill my heart with joy.

— Pre-order The Jane Austen Society. Yes, there’s a new Austen-themed novel coming out, and Richard Armitage* is reading the audiobook! The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner, with starred reviews from Booklist and Library Journal, is “a fictional telling of the start of the society in the 1940s in the village of Chawton, where Austen wrote or revised her major works.” Doesn’t it sound lovely? Speaking of sound, here’s a snippet of the performance by Armitage. The novel releases on May 26 in the U.S.

*NOTE: If you’re a fan of Richard Armitage’s voice, check out all the Audible books he has narrated. I was gobsmacked!

— Listen to Shedunnit, “the podcast that unravels the mysteries behind classic detective stories.” The latest episode is about Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane, and thus of particular interest to me, but there’s much more you’ll wish to explore.

— If you’re a fan of Hallmark movies, particularly the Christmas ones, fill out the Merry Madness Christmas Bracket. You can create up to 10 brackets and maybe even win some cash. This form of March Madness may not be as exciting as the NCAA basketball tournament, but it’s a nice distraction.

–ALSO, Hallmark’s Spring Fling starts March 28. In the meantime try to catch a repeat of In the Key of Love or watch it online. We loved it.

— Reorganize your tea cabinet. (Or any cabinet/drawer that contains magical things but has become untidy.) Trust me, it feels SO GOOD. I started with my tea cabinet and then moved on to every cabinet in the kitchen. But really, I only moved on to the other, less interesting cabinets because I was still on a high from tidying my teas. Check it out:

–Watch Schitt’s Creek on Netflix. It’s adorable, but you do have to give it a couple of episodes before you connect to the characters. This show makes me so cheerful, and sometimes (more often in later seasons) it’s so poignant that it makes me cry. Another great option: Playing House. This is my ultimate comfort show. I have downloaded all three seasons to my phone, and I often watch it on airplanes when the turbulence is rattling me. Maggie and Emma are a lovable pair of friends, and the actresses are besties in real life.

— Read the Ruth Galloway mysteries by Elly Griffiths, or download the audiobooks from Audible.com. This incredibly appealing series of cozy mysteries will distract you from the harsh realities of our world. (Or just save you from boredom.)

— Make cocoa with marshmallows. I love this recipe from Epicurious.

— Take a long walk. It’s good for your body and will clear your mind. If the quiet streets freak you out, go home and drink more cocoa.

— Work a puzzle. There must be at least one of them lurking in a closet somewhere.

— Meditate. I like the guided meditations on the Calm App. They have wonderfully soporific sleep stories, too, if you’re having trouble falling asleep at night.

— Learn. Surely you’ve seen the ads for a free month of “The Great Courses” online? Go here for more information.

— Start or end your day with journaling. I’m addicted to this practice, and it has become my morning therapy. If you have no idea where/how to start, google “journal prompts” and you’ll find endless lists of questions and suggestions. As I’ve mentioned before (here, for instance), I love the journals from Paperblanks. But any old notebook will do.

— ETA: If all else fails, watch this: Coronavirus Rhapsody

Have a suggestion for this list? Do share in the comments!

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Featured image credit: ID 85961367 © Stanislav Salamanov | Dreamstime.com

Friday Favorites: Old Friends Revisited

Dear old blog o’ mine, I’ve missed you! I’m back from my travels (see my instagram for recent photos) and am eager to get back into the routine here.

Lately I’ve had cozy mysteries on the brain. To be honest, I’m always in the mood for cozy English mysteries–particularly those set in the 1920s and 30s. Lately, however, I’ve struggled to find anything new, so I turned to a couple of old favorites.


Mrs. Bradley Mysteries
When I saw it featured on BritBox, I was keen to revisit this five-episode series from 1999-2000. (The dvd set also is available for purchase from Amazon.) The episodes are fun and frothy, with a very manageable amount of menace and Gothic spookiness. Diana Rigg is marvelous, of course, and I happen to like when Mrs. Bradley breaks the fourth wall to explain things to viewers. It’s all good fun, though I rather wish I’d skipped “Rising of the Moon,” the traveling circus episode. (Why do traveling circus episodes–no matter the series–so often end up tedious and mildly offensive?)

You might be interested to know that Mrs. Bradley’s creator, Gladys Mitchell, wrote 66 (!!) books featuring this heroine, and was a member of the Detection Club along with many familiar mystery writers of the 1930s (including Dorothy Sayers & Agatha Christie). I’ve just started The Croaking Raven and it’s interesting to find the sleuth, referred to as “Dame Beatrice” rather than Mrs. Bradley, much less glamorous than her TV counterpart. Still a hoot, however!


Brat Farrar
When I was a teen my mom lured me into watching the BBC adaptation of Josephine Tey’s Brat Farrar on PBS. Though I was skeptical at first, I was quite smitten by the lead actor, Mark Greenstreet, and soon enough was thoroughly drawn into the mystery. This may, in fact, have been my introduction to cozy mysteries, for it wasn’t until the next year that the Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane trilogy aired on PBS. (Note: I can’t find the Brat Farrar series on DVD or streaming, but apparently one can watch it on YouTube!)

Just last week I was facing a long solo drive to TN and was looking for a mystery on audio to help while away the time. You can imagine how pleased I was to find a well-reviewed audio adaptation of Brat Farrar on Audible.com. I was quite impressed by Carole Boyd’s vocal performance, and the mystery was even more compelling to Adult Sonia than it was to the teen. (Horsey people will particularly like this book.) If you’re a fan of audio books and Josephine Tey, you might try it. As for me, I probably need to read all the Inspector Grant novels, yes? (Daughter of Time is a favorite of mine.) I’d also like to find a good biography of Tey, so if you have one to recommend do let me know. I did listen to the first book in Nicola Upson’s series featuring Josephine Tey as a sleuth, but didn’t love it. Perhaps I should try reading rather than listening? This Q&A with Upson intrigues me.

How about you? What lovely books have you been reading lately?