Tag Archives: movies

Literary Walks: Lyme Regis

Dear reader, I meant to offer a “Tea and a Book” recommendation for June, but there was just too much to do in preparation for travel. I will try again later this month. In the meantime I thought I’d start a new feature on the blog — “Literary Walks.” I love to follow in the footsteps of authors and view the inspirations for their settings and conflicts. Who knows, perhaps I could collect enough material for a guidebook? We’ll see how it goes.

Today’s post is inspired by a setting shared by four of my favorite novels.
(Each image is linked to Goodreads)

Lyme Regis lies on the Dorset/Devon border in the south of England. I’ve borrowed a map provided by The Alexandra Hotel to help orient you to the town. (Just so you know, The Alexandra is a lovely place to stay, with two restaurants and numerous rooms that overlook the sea. They also offer a glorious afternoon tea.)


I suggest starting your walk on Silver Street at the Mariner’s Hotel, which once was known as Morley Cottage. Elizabeth Philpot, an enthusiastic fossil hunter featured in Tracy Chevalier’s Remarkable Creatures, lived here with her sisters. Continue on to Broad Street, the main shopping area, and browse the shops–you’ll find clothing, hiking supplies, jewelry, art, fossils, and more. You also might fortify yourself at one of the many restaurants.


Then walk along the Marine Parade to the stone jetty known as the Cobb and take special notice of “Granny’s Teeth,” the little steps that silly Louisa Musgrove leaps from in Persuasion. While on the Cobb also think of the mysterious Sarah Woodruff, the so-called “French Lieutenant’s Woman,” standing alone and staring out to sea in a way that thoroughly captivates Charles Smithson. Make time to visit the Lyme Regis Museum, formerly the site of Mary Anning‘s shop, to learn about the Jurassic coast as well Lyme’s history and literary connections.

There are at least two fine beaches for fossil hunting, but do keep the tide tables in mind. Monmouth Beach (see at the lower left on the map above) is always a good bet, and you can imagine yourself Mary Anning or Elizabeth Philpott as you search for ammonites and other specimens. This page gives all the details on Lyme’s beaches.


For me, the most intriguing aspect of Lyme Regis is the Undercliff. I will Let John Fowles explain in this passage from The French Lieutenant’s Woman:

There runs, between Lyme Regis and Axmouth six miles to the west, one of the strangest coastal landscapes in Southern England […] People have been lost in it for hours, and cannot believe, when they see on the map where they were lost, that their sense of isolation–and if the weather be bad, desolation–could have seemed so great.

The Undercliff–for this land is really the mile-long slope caused by the erosion of the ancient vertical cliff face–is very steep. Flat places are as rare as visitors in it. But this steepness in effect tilts it, and its vegetation, towards the sun; and it is this fact, together with the water from the countless springs that have caused the erosion, that lends the area its botanical strangeness–its wild arbutus and ilex and other trees rarely seen growing in England; its enormous ashes and beeches; its green Brazilian chasms choked with ivy and the liana of wild clematis; its bracken that grows seven, eight feet tall; its flowers that bloom a month earlier than anywhere else in the district. In summer it is the nearest this country can offer to a tropical jungle.

I love these images of Sarah in the Undercliff from the 1981 film.

If you’d like to know more, here is a more detailed description of one woman’s trek from Lyme Regis to Seaton through the Undercliff. As for us, it took a little over four hours to get to Seaton (including time for photos and a lunch break). Of course, you don’t have to walk the entire thing. I do, however, recommend a particular diversion off the main path that I learned about while reading Penelope Lively’s Whitbread Award-winning A Stitch in Time. In the book, the Lucas family invites Maria Foster and her parents to a “proper beach” that can only be accessed from the Undercliff path. The way proves precarious:

Maria put one foot slowly and carefully in front of the other, steadying herself with a hand on a sapling or jutting rock where possible. Once she skidded on some treacherous shale that slithered under her shoes, so that she sat down hard, bruising herself. It could have been worse. Below and out of sight, hair-raising cries from the other children suggested fatal accidents of one kind or another. […] At last they were all down and there, as promised, was a beach. Though not, at first sight, a beach very much different from any other except that, also as promised, there was no one else in sight.


In 2015 Steve and I found that beach, and Lively did not exaggerate the difficulty of the descent. But it was all worth it when we found what I now call “the secret beach” and enjoyed it all on our own for quite some time. (Yes, that rocky beach is tough to walk on, but the feeling of utter isolation in this magical landscape more than compensated for the strain on our ankles.)

Well, that’s at least a full day of walking for you when you visit Lyme Regis! Other things you might do that aren’t particularly literary–walk to Golden Cap, have a nice bathe in the sea (cold but so refreshing!), rent a kayak, go fishing for mackerel, and much more. Click here for more information.

I’m hoping to offer one more Literary Walk before we return, so please stay tuned!

2018 Spooky Film Recs, Part IV: Family Viewing

For my final “Spooky Films” post, I’m offering some suggestions for family viewing. If you’re new to the blog and have younger children, you might check my 2016 post that includes solidly PG films. If you have tweens and teens interested in watching horror, the following PG/PG-13 options might appeal. Of course, you are the best judge of what your kids can or can’t handle in a scary film.

As usual, all film synopses are from imdb.com.


Spirited Away (2001) — Rated PG
During her family’s move to the suburbs, a sullen 10-year-old girl wanders into a world ruled by gods, witches, and spirits, and where humans are changed into beasts.
You’re all probably way ahead of me on this one. I’d heard about it for years but didn’t think it was my sort of thing. Then I watched with a friend and her kiddos. Gosh! Such a lovely, haunting, and spooky film. “No Face” (seen above in the middle) now numbers among my very favorite film characters. Those in the know — are there any other spooky anime films I should track down?
Watch the trailer / available on DVD only (from various retailers) / Metascore: 96
(the highest IMDB metascore of any film I’ve recommended!)
Goth-o-Meter: medium-ish?


Down a Dark Hall (2018) — PG-13
A troubled teen named Kit Gordy is forced to join the exclusive Blackwood Boarding School, just to find herself trapped by dark forces around its mysterious headmistress, Madame Duret.
This one had me at “all-female boarding school.” Fans of Lois Duncan should get a kick out of it — the setting is properly Gothic and the cast (featuring Uma Thurman with a believable French accent) is strong. The atmosphere oozes with old-fashioned menace, but the students bring a modern edge to the “haunted boarding school” narrative. Lots of drama and even a little romance.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 56
Goth-o-Meter: high


Our House (2018) — PG-13
A young genius accidentally invents a device that amplifies the paranormal activity within his family’s house, possibly bringing back the spirits of loved ones, and unleashing things far worse.
I like a little technology with my ghosts, especially when accidental contact occurs. The pacing in this one isn’t without its problems, but I found the family very appealing and right away I cared about their safety. You might call this a “modern domestic ghost story,” and I like that it offers mystery and chills without going too far with jump scares or violence.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 45
(the lowest metascore of all my recs, but I really did think this was worth watching!)
Goth-o-Meter: medium to high


Beautiful Creatures (2013) — PG-13
Ethan longs to escape his small Southern town. He meets a mysterious new girl, Lena. Together, they uncover dark secrets about their respective families, their history and their town.
I read this book when it first came out and quite enjoyed it, but the trailers for the film turned me off. It all just looked waaaay over-the-top. But when I was searching for films to watch this year, this one came up again and again as a strong option. After all, it does have an incredible cast–Jeremy Irons, Viola Davis, Emmy Rossum, Eileen Atkins and Emma Thompson–but it’s Alden Ehrenreich and Alice Englert who make this movie work. If you can get past Ehrenreich’s Forrest Gump-voiceover at the beginning, you’ll see what I mean. They are both sympathetic and have great chemistry together. Yes, there are outrageous moments in this film, but overall I found it intriguing and satisfying — including the (somewhat abrupt) ending.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 52
Goth-o-Meter: high


Happy Death Day (2017) — PG-13
A college student must relive the day of her murder over and over again, in a loop that will end only when she discovers her killer’s identity.
As I’ve said before, I don’t enjoy slasher films unless they are quirky and/or funny. This horror spin on Groundhog Day was exactly what I was looking for. I’ve seen it characterized as “relentlessly violent,” but I assure you that there’s not much blood/gore at all, and though the film does get the pulse racing, the tone is playful. It’s along the lines of the SCREAM movies, but with much less blood.
Watch the trailer / options for viewing / Metascore: 57
Goth-o-Meter: low

Here’s a list of other PG-13 Horror options, though I’m kind of horrified that The Ring is included. That one really got to me–I enjoyed it, but it’s more at the “disturbing” end of the spooky continuum. There are moments in that film I wish I could unsee.

Also keep in mind that two of the films mentioned earlier in my 2018 recs are PG-13 — A Quiet Place and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. The Endless is unrated, but I think it would be appropriate for teens and mature tweens.

That’s it for 2018, folks! Happy Horror Viewing and REMEMBER, if at any point you wish to browse previous spooky film recs (going all the way back to 2012), click the tag “spooky film recs” in the list below–or in the sidebar–and scroll to your heart’s content.

2018 Spooky Film Recs, Part III: Ghost-free Horror

Today you’ll find paranormal, sci-fi, slasher, and post-apocalyptic films, but there’s nary a ghost in the bunch! (As far as I could tell, at least.)

As always, the brief synopses are from imdb.com.


The Ritual (2017) — Rated: TV-MA
A group of college friends reunite for a trip to the forest, but encounter a menacing presence in the woods that is stalking them.
Add a paranormal twist to Deliverance**, set the story in northern Sweden, and you have a very EERIE film! Great cast led by Rafe Spall, but also including Robert James-Collier (Downton Abbey’s conniving Thomas) in a strong and sympathetic role.
**Those who have seen Deliverance please note: The Ritual is a freaky film, but not Ned Beatty-in-peril freaky, okay? I wouldn’t do that to you.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 57
Goth-o-Meter: medium


The Endless (2017) — Not rated
As kids, they escaped a UFO death cult. Now, two adult brothers seek answers after an old videotape surfaces and brings them back to where they began.
The director and writer of this film also play the two brothers, and their on-film relationship brought to mind Sam and Dean from Supernatural. I really, really enjoyed this story — so much that I sought out Benson and Moorhead’s earlier film, Resolution, featuring a pair of characters that have a cameo in this film. I’m kinda glad that I watched them in reverse order, and I look forward to more stories from this writer/director duo.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 80
Goth-o-Meter: medium


Better Watch Out (2016) — Rated R
On a quiet suburban street, a babysitter must defend a twelve-year-old boy from intruders, only to discover it’s far from a normal home invasion.
I expected this to be typical slasher fare, but there is a twist — that’s why I’m sharing a clip rather than the official trailer. I typically don’t enjoy slasher films unless they are quirky and/or satirical. This one definitely has its moments.
Watch a clip / Options for viewing / Metascore: 67
Goth-o-Meter: low to medium?


Train to Busan (2016) — Rated TV-MA
While a zombie virus breaks out in South Korea, passengers struggle to survive on the train from Seoul to Busan.
This film has appeared on so many “best horror” lists, but I resisted due to zombie fatigue. (I blame The Walking Dead.) However, I finally decided to give it a try, and it might be my favorite spooky film viewed this year. With its nuanced characters, gut-wrenching tension, and impressive special effects, Train to Busan is a fresh and poignant take on the “zombie apocalypse” theme.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 72
Goth-o-Meter: low


The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016) — Rated R
A father and son, both coroners, are pulled into a complex mystery while attempting to identify the body of a young woman, who was apparently harboring dark secrets.
I can’t think of any other movie quite like this spooky mystery set in a morgue. The chemistry between Brian Cox and Emile Hirsche, playing father and son, was the most appealing thing about it. Since the plot revolves around an autopsy, you know it will be a special sort of gruesome. Consider that fair warning!
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 65
Goth-o-Meter: medium

***You might also consider:

Wildling (2018) — Rated R
A blossoming teenager uncovers the dark secret behind her traumatic childhood.
A new spin on the werewolf story, but perhaps it goes a bit off the rails in the final act? If you watch, I’d be interested to know what you think.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 58

It Comes at Night (2017) — Rated R
Secure within a desolate home as an unnatural threat terrorizes the world, a man has established a tenuous domestic order with his wife and son. Then a desperate young family arrives seeking refuge.
This tense and claustrophobic story probably won’t appeal to those seeking monsters and jump scares. More psychological thriller than horror, this is another film from producer/distributor A24, which also brought us The Witch, Hereditary, and The Blackcoat’s Daughter.
Watch the trailer / Options for viewing / Metascore: 78

Check back on Monday when I’ll be recommending “family viewing” horror film options. AND REMEMBER, if at any point you wish to browse previous spooky film recs (going all the way back to 2012), click the tag “spooky film recs” in the list below–or in the sidebar–and scroll to your heart’s content.

2018 Spooky Film Recs Part II: Ghostly Favorites

In this post I hope to inspire you to watch some ghost films that flew under the radar during the past couple of years. I’ve come to appreciate lower-budget/independent ghostly films because there’s much less reliance on expensive special effects and, in many cases, more appreciation of characterization and tension. If you’ve already seen or plan to watch any of the options suggested here, please let me know what you think!

As always, the brief synopses are from imdb.com.


The Lodgers (2017) — Rated R
1920, rural Ireland. Anglo Irish twins Rachel and Edward share a strange existence in their crumbling family estate.
This was right up my alley in the Gothic department–haunting and atmospheric if not truly frightening. (Seriously, if you prefer a fast-paced story with lots of jump scares, don’t bother with this one.) Charlotte Vega is quite good as dominant twin Rachel, but the true star of this film is Loftus Hall, a centuries-old (and reputedly haunted-in-real-life) Irish country house. While there is a strong fantasy element to the story, the script also takes into account the social and political turmoil in early 20th century Ireland. I would watch this one again–it’s so lovely to look at!
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 52
Goth-o-Meter: very high


Marrowbone (2017) — Rated R
A young man and his three younger siblings, who have kept secret the death of their beloved mother in order to remain together, are plagued by a sinister presence in the sprawling manor in which they live.
Marrowbone offers so many of my favorite things: a gorgeous setting (supposedly the U.S. but actually filmed in Spain), a focus on characterization, moments of sweetness that balance the Gothic peril, and an ending that makes you want to go back to the beginning and watch all over again. (Random observation: this will only resonate with people of a certain age, but to me it’s almost like a horror version of Dear Lola, which was adapted to film as The Beniker Gang.) The film is not without flaws, but it’s very compelling overall and I will watch it again. Stranger Things fans will be pleased to see Charlie Heaton–and to hear his native English accent.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 63
Goth-o-Meter: high


Personal Shopper (2016) — Rated R
A personal shopper in Paris refuses to leave the city until she makes contact with her twin brother who previously died there. Her life becomes more complicated when a mysterious person contacts her via text message.
If you’re looking for a very unique sort of ghost story/mystery, this might fit the bill. It does require patience and an open mind, but the film really is rather fabulous. I re-watched several scenes afterwards and couldn’t stop thinking about it for days–I hadn’t expected to find Kristen Stewart so compelling. (Reviews are all over the place with this one–so it was reassuring that my favorite YouTube film reviewer, Chris Stuckmann, liked it as much as I did).
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 77
Goth-o-Meter: medium (there are Gothic moments in this film, but overall I consider it to be more in the realm of Noir.)


The Keeping Hours (2017) — Rated PG-13
10 years after the death of their son, a divorced couple is suddenly reunited by supernatural events that offer them a chance at forgiveness.
This film must have gone straight to Netflix–it has no reviews from mainstream critics–so I went in with low expectations. You guys! It really got to me. First of all, fans of Lee Pace should watch–he is lovely and will break your heart in the best way. (He’s a native Oklahoman, y’all!) This film derives its eeriness more from grief and longing than jump scares. There are deliciously spooky bits, but nothing to give you nightmares. If you’re anything like me, you’ll cry and find it all very cathartic.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / No IMDB metascore — check Rotten Tomatoes
Goth-o-Meter: medium to high

***You might also consider:

Ghost Stories (2017) — Not Rated
Skeptical professor Phillip Goodman embarks on a trip to the terrifying after finding a file with details of three unexplained cases of apparitions. (Adapted from a play and featuring Martin Freeman in one of the vignettes.)
The three cases are interesting and spooky, but the frame narrative did not work for me.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 68
Goth-o-Meter: medium to high?

A Ghost Story (2017) — rated R
In this singular exploration of legacy, love, loss, and the enormity of existence, a recently deceased, white-sheeted ghost returns to his suburban home to try to reconnect with his bereft wife.
Not a “thrill-a-minute” sort of ghost movie. It is fascinating and quite moving, but perhaps a smidge pretentious? Your mileage may vary. (There is a cool tribute to Poltergeist at the mid-point. In fact, I was fascinated by this slideshow overview of the writer/director’s influences.)
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / Metascore: 84
Goth-o-Meter: medium

Check back on Wednesday when I’ll be recommending “under the radar” ghost-free horror films. AND REMEMBER, if at any point you wish to browse previous spooky film recs (going all the way back to 2012), click the tag “spooky film recs” in the list below–or in the sidebar–and scroll to your heart’s content.

2018 Spooky Film Recs Part I: Mainstream Favorites

Today I launch the 2018 Spooky Film Blog Series with four mainstream favorites released in 2018. Since you’ve probably already heard of them, I won’t write lengthy reviews. I will include helpful links, however, and with my Geeked on Gothic post in mind, I’ll rate each film’s Gothic content using my (incredibly simplistic) Goth-o-Meter.

The brief synopses are from imdb.com.


Annihilation (rated R)
A biologist signs up for a dangerous, secret expedition into a mysterious zone where the laws of nature don’t apply.
This eerie and unforgettable example of Scifi horror requires deep engagement from the viewer, but your patience will be rewarded with a mind-blowing finale.
Watch the Trailer / Options for streaming / IMDB metascore: 79
Goth-o-Meter: low


A Quiet Place (rated PG-13)
In a post-apocalyptic world, a family is forced to live in silence while hiding from monsters with ultra-sensitive hearing.
This film impressed me with its unusual concept, breathtaking performances, and TENSION. Suitable for viewing with tweens/teens.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / IMDB metascore: 82
Goth-o-Meter: low to medium?


Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (rated PG-13)
When the island’s dormant volcano begins roaring to life, Owen and Claire mount a campaign to rescue the remaining dinosaurs from this extinction-level event.
I freely admit to having felt a little “meh” when we went to see this, so imagine my surprise when the film turned into a GOTHIC MYSTERY. Lots of fun! My 12-year-old niece quite enjoyed it.
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / IMDB metascore: 51 (really?)
Goth-o-Meter: unexpectedly high


Hereditary (rated R)
After the family matriarch passes away, a grieving family is haunted by tragic and disturbing occurrences, and begin to unravel dark secrets.
Hereditary is shocking, scalp-pricklingly creepy, and its slow burn of horror will stay seared on my brain for the rest of my days. That said, I’m aching to see it again, but I may need a buddy to hold my hand!
Watch the trailer / Options for streaming / IMDB metascore: 87
Goth-o-Meter: high

Also, keep in my mind that Mike Flanagan’s “modern reimagining” of The Haunting of Hill House has its Netflix premiere on October 12. I love his films–check them out here–but this trailer will boggle the minds of Shirley Jackson fans:


For more context, you might cast a sideways glance at the positive reviews from Variety, Forbes, and Screen Anarchy.

Check back on Thursday when I’ll be recommending “under the radar” ghostly films. AND REMEMBER, if at any point you wish to browse previous spooky film recs (going back to 2012), click the tag “spooky film recs” in the list below or in the sidebar and scroll to your heart’s content.